Conference "Migration and Demographic Challenges: New Policy Approaches in Japan and Germany"

Under a worldwide trend of growing anti-globalism and anti-refugee movements, both Japan and Germany need objective, fact-based approaches to issues surrounding immigration. By sharing the experiences in this field, Japanese and German experts and politicians will learn from each other and formulate forward-looking migration policies that can contribute to a dynamic and sustainable future.

Japan and Germany face tremendous common challenges stemming from an aging society. As of today, Japan’s ageing ratio has hit 27%, the highest in the world; Germany’s ageing ratio sits at 21%, the third highest. To cope with serious demographic and labor problems, Germany has been proactively accepting immigrants into its labor force, whereas Japan has not eased its immigration policies for the time being. However, the Japanese government is currently aiming to enact the world’s fastest permanent visa process for highly skilled workers, and is expected to discuss more proactive policies that will address Japan's aggravating depopulation and insufficient labor force.

Under a worldwide trend of growing anti-globalism and anti-refugee movements, both Japan and Germany need objective, fact-based approaches to issues surrounding immigration. By sharing the experiences in this field, Japanese and German experts and politicians will learn from each other and formulate forward-looking migration policies that can contribute to a dynamic and sustainable future.

22 February 2016, 13:00-17:30
International House of Japan / Iwasaki Koyata Memorial Hall
www.i-house.or.jp/eng/access.html

Simultaneous interpretation (Japanese/German)

Organized by Japan Center for International Exchange (JCIE) and Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES)
Supported by Japanisch-Deutsches Zentrum Berlin (JDZB)

Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung
Japan Office

7-5-56 Akasaka
Minato-ku
Tokyo, 107-0052
Japan

+03 6277-7551
+03 3588-6035

office(at)fes-japan.org

Photo: Conference, FES Japan

Events

Conference "Migration and Demographic Challenges: New Policy Approaches in Japan and Germany"

Under a worldwide trend of growing anti-globalism and anti-refugee movements, both Japan and Germany need objective, fact-based approaches to issues surrounding immigration. By sharing the experiences in this field, Japanese and German experts and politicians will learn from each other and formulate forward-looking migration policies that can contribute to a dynamic and sustainable future.

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Reception "50 Years FES in Japan"

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Graphic: Publications, J. Traud

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